Setup a Public Cassandra Cluster with Docker

In one of my last blogs I explained how you can setup a cassandra cluster in a docker-swarm. The advantage of a container environment like docker-swarm or kubernetes is that you can run Cassandra with its default settings and without additional security setup. This is because the cluster nodes running within a container environment can connect securely to each other via the kubernetes or docker-swarm virtual network and need not publish any ports to the outer world. This kind of a setup for a Cassandra cluster can be fine for many cases. But what if you want to setup a Cassandra cluster in a more open network? For example in a public cloud so you can access the cluster form different services or your client? In this case it is necessary to secure your Cassandra cluster.

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The Attack on Our Freedom as Computer Users

“Meltdown and Spectre are errors. Grave errors, to be sure, but not evidently malicious. Everyone makes mistakes.
Intel has done far worse with its CPUs than make a mistake. It has built in an intentional back door called the Management Engine.
Important as these bugs are, don’t let Intel’s mistakes distract you from Intel’s deliberate attack!”

by Free Software Foundation president Richard Stallman

 

With security issues like the Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities discovered in Intel chips in early 2018, it became more important than ever to talk about the necessity of software freedom in these deeply embedded technologies. Serious as though these bugs may be, we cannot let them distract us from the broader issues: Intel considers the Intel Management Engine a feature, while it’s nothing more than a threat to user freedom. Take a look to Denis GNUtoo Carikli article which provides a new basis for that conversation.